The Festival of Troubadours Review Netflix: Not so Good Execution Fails a Wonderful Idea in this Turkish Film

Often, we come across works of art that are not usually seen in the global entertainment world. Though they tend to serve an international audience, such films are born from the obscure cultural realms of a micro-state.

Also Read: Another Self (AnotherSelf) Series Review

The Festival of Troubadours is a new Turkish movie streaming on Netflix. It has an unpopular context and presentation that seems intriguing from the outset. If you have watched the film’s trailer, you must have been drawn to it to some extent.

However, does the film really deliver what it promises? Here’s my The Festival of Troubadours review, which will help you make a mindful decision about whether to stream it or not.

The Festival of Troubadours Review Summary

Keeping Folk music at the center of the plot, The Festival of Troubadours traverses a cavernous idea of personal relationships. However, the narration eases in quality after a time.

The Festival of Troubadours Synopsis

Yusuf finds himself in a spot of bother when his father shows up as a houseguest after a 25-year hiatus. The old man asks his son for help but, in the process, scrapes several wounds from the past.

Image Credits: Netflix

Also Read: As The Crow Flies Review

Directed by Özcan Alpar, The Festival of Troubadours stars Kıvanç Tatlıtuğ (Yusuf) and Settar Tanrıöğen (Whimsy Ali) in lead roles.

Furthermore, it is based on the book Asiklar Bayrami by Kemal Varol.

What Works for The Festival of Troubadours?

Depth of the Story

The Turkish film unravels an essentially covert story of a father and his son. It makes you think about family relationships, the importance of life, and the need to let go of particular grievances. The Festival of Troubadours never appears to be tottering around the concept. Instead, it goes on to explore it deeply.

Image Credits: Netflix

Most importantly, the makers don’t try to be preachy. Only if the execution had been better would we have witnessed a masterclass.

The Hidden Crux

One commendable thing about The Festival of Troubadours is the hidden meaning of life in its plot. I cannot assure you of a wholesome experience, but it does leave a minor impact by making you introspect.

Also Read: Doom of Love Netflix Movie Review

Moreover, it also showcases how the lengths of passion are indomitable. Yusuf’s dad may have lost everything in the quest to hold on to his dream; however, the respect he earned is phenomenal. Still, was he right, or did he not choose the correct path?

That’s the kind of introspection I talk about.

Performances

As Yusuf, Kıvanç Tatlıtuğ ameliorates the tempo of The Festival of Troubadours. His dashing and unwavering personality adds a touch of freshness to this generally dull film. The actor ensures to hold the momentum and keeps creative downfalls at bay. From intense scenes to emotionally exhaustive parts, Kıvanç never fails to amuse you.

Image Credits: Netflix

Settar Tanrıöğen plays Whimsy Ali in The Festival of Troubadours. As a veteran singer, he deploys grace and calmness into his performance. Moreover, the depth of his voice strongly influences your movie-watching experience. All the pauses Settar takes look natural and without any overt fuss.

What Doesn’t Work for The Festival of Troubadours?

Slow Moving

Initially, The Festival of Troubadours builds interest and draws the viewer’s attention. However, it falls after the first thirty minutes due to a loitering pace. While you would invest your time waiting for emotional elevation, the movie will offer nothing more than dwindling sensations.

Ideas like these either need a crisp narrational speed or a taut screenplay mixed with uplifting emotions. Unfortunately, The Festival of Troubadours cannot ace any of it completely.

Lousy Execution

The problem with The Festival of Troubadours is that it cannot come out of the shadow of its source material. Some changes and adaptations were required to make the film presentable for the screen.

Image Credits: Netflix

In the present form, though I have not read the book, it seems The Festival of Troubadours is an almost exact replica of Asiklar Bayrami.

How can I draw such a conclusion? Because the kind of ambiance a moving presentation usually has is missing from The Festival of Troubadours. And me being an author, I can sense the creators didn’t want to meddle with the original story. Therefore, they decided to keep things subtle, which didn’t come out well.

Final Word

For a book, The Festival of Troubadours is a gold mine. However, its screen adaptation is void of powerful impact. The movie might have worked wonders a decade ago, but in today’s times, it will not find many takers.

FAQs

What is The Festival of Troubadours?

As stated in the film, every year, musicians from all over Turkey gather at a place and play folk songs and do battles.

Is The Festival of Troubadours based on a true story?

No, The Festival of Troubadours is not based on a true story. It is based on a book by Kemal Varol.

Who is a Troubadour?

Any singer, poet, or musician can be called a Troubadour.

close

Hey, avid reader 👋
It’s nice to meet you.

Please Sign up to receive awesome content in your inbox, as it publishes.

Select list(s):

We don’t spam! Read our privacy policy for more info.

Sign up to receive awesome content in your inbox regularly.

We don’t spam! Read our privacy policy for more info.

Select list(s):

Leave a Reply